Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd Annual Congress and Medicare Expo on Trauma & Critical Care London, UK.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Tim Collins

Teleflex Medical, UK

Keynote: Think Sepsis! Think Intraosseous!

Time : 10:00-10:40 AM

Trauma 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tim Collins photo
Biography:

Tim Collins has 20 years of experience in Critical Care. He holds the position of Consultant Nurse, Lead Nurse, Charge Nurse, ICU Educator and Senior Lecturer. He is currently a British Association of Critical Care Nurses (BACCN) elected national board member and Editorial Board Member of Nursing in Critical Care Journal (Wiley). He has given a number of presentations at European & international conferences and has published a number of papers in peer reviewed journals and book chapters. He completed his Doctorate Degree and MSc in Critical Care. He is an Instructor in both Adult and Pediatric Advanced Life Support. His interests include Sepsis, Clinical Shock, Vascular Access, Resuscitation, Organ Donation and Hemodynamic monitoring. 

Abstract:

Overview: This presentation will use an interactive case study approach to discuss the use of delivering evidence based sepsis interventions through intraosseous (IO) access.  The presentation will evaluate the evidence behind the use of achieving fluid resuscitation, antibiotic administration and IO sampling in a hypotensive difficult vascular access critically ill sepsis patient. Published literature will be innovatively evaluated and woven into the clinical case study.  This will refer to the recently published 2016 revised International sepsis guidelines that recommend the use of IO in providing an alternative route for administering antibiotics and fluids that achieves comparable antibiotic plasma concentrations compared to IV.

Originality: Originality will focus on the use of achieving sepsis management through the IO route where conference papers nearly exclusively concentrates upon IV or central venous approaches in sepsis management. IO vascular access is traditionally viewed as an intervention reserved for cardiac arrest however this presentation will challenge this concept in providing novel approaches to delivering time critical sepsis treatment through the IO route.

Applicability to Critical & Emergency Care: Sepsis is one of the most frequent causes of clinical deterioration that often requires critical care intervention and admission.  All critical care & emergency providers need to have the knowledge and skills to effectively treat sepsis patients.  Sepsis patients require early vascular access and treatment and this presentation will share with practitioners that the IO route is an effective alternative to IV use in the critically ill patient with sepsis

Impact for improving patient care: Globally Sepsis is one of the major avoidable deaths. The evidence shows that delays in antibiotic administration & fluid therapy increases mortality.  In difficult vascular access situations, the IO route can provide a timely alternative to IV access to ensure that antibiotic and fluid resuscitation is commenced early that will provide direct improvements to patient mortality and morbidity from sepsis. The presentation will challenge practitioner’s perceptions that IO can provide an effective alternative to IV access in the critically ill. 

Trauma 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alessandra Falco photo
Biography:

Alessandra Falco has completed her PhD in Social and Personality Psychology from Padua University. She is now Researcher and Adjunct Professor of Work and Organizational Psychology at Padua University. Her research areas are: (a) work-related stress risk assessment, with particular reference to the development of “integrated” tools, based on subjective, objective, and physiological indicators; (b) the role of specific individual and behavioral dimensions (workaholism, negative affectivity, mindfulness, PsyCap resources, perfectionism, presenteeism) in the etiology of organizational well-being/disease; (c) social marketing, communication and change, with particular reference to traffic psychology.               

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem:

Workplace bullying (WB) is a potential source of psychological trauma [1], and is considered as a serious problem in the healthcare sector [2]. Additionally, WB may have detrimental consequences for both the workers (e.g., clinical depression/anxiety, cardiovascular disease) and the organization (e.g., poor quality of care, sickness absences) [2-4]. Therefore, given the relevance of workplace bullying, the purpose of this study is to investigate the association between WB and serum levels of a possible biomarker of stress, namely Interleukin 17 (IL-17), a pro-inflammatory cytokine that may contribute to chronic inflammation [5]. Indeed, according to the Allostatic Load Model, inflammation may play a role in the stress process, since the exposure to chronic or repeated stressful situations (such as WB) may lead to the sustained activation of primary mediators, including pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines. This, in turn, may lead to secondary mediators (e.g., C-reactive Protein) and, in the long run, to physical (e.g., cardiovascular disease) or psychological (e.g., depression) diseases [6-7].

Methodology: The study was conducted in an Italian healthcare organization. Nurses and doctors (N = 98) completed a self-report questionnaire (Cronbach's alpha = .84) aimed at determining WB. Moreover, participants underwent a clinical interview, followed by a blood sample withdrawal.

Findings: Multiple regression analysis showed that WB was positively associated with IL-17 (β = .24, p < .05), controlling for the effect of possible confounders, namely gender, age, and BMI.

Conclusion & Significance: This study provide initial support for the hypothesis that WB is positively associated with IL-17, a possible biomarker of stress. Therefore, given its negative consequences, organizations and practitioners should implement interventions aimed at preventing WB, providing workers at risk with resources to cope with WB, and reducing the negative impact of WB on the health of the worker (i.e., primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention).ental Medicine 60:779-783.

 

 

Trauma 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alessandro De-Carlo photo
Biography:

Alessandro De Carlo has completed his PhD in Organizational Psychology at Università Cattolica of Milan and Cardiff University. He coordinates the Master of human resources management at LUMSA University of Rome and is the President of the Veneto Region Board of Psychologists as well as the Secretary of the National Board of Psychologists and chair of the Europsy Certificate Awarding Committee.

His research areas are: (a) organizational well-being and work-related stress risk assessment, organizational interventions aimed at reducing organizational disease and increasing performance; (b) etiology of organizational well-being/disease, workplace bulling; (c) social marketing, communication and change.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem:

Workplace bullying (WB) is a potential source of psychological trauma [1], and is considered as a serious problem in the healthcare sector [2]. Additionally, WB may have detrimental consequences for both the workers (e.g., clinical depression/anxiety, cardiovascular disease) and the organization (e.g., poor quality of care, sickness absences) [2-4]. Therefore, given the relevance of workplace bullying, the purpose of this study is to investigate the association between WB and serum levels of a possible biomarker of stress, namely Interleukin 17 (IL-17), a pro-inflammatory cytokine that may contribute to chronic inflammation [5]. Indeed, according to the Allostatic Load Model, inflammation may play a role in the stress process, since the exposure to chronic or repeated stressful situations (such as WB) may lead to the sustained activation of primary mediators, including pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines. This, in turn, may lead to secondary mediators (e.g., C-reactive Protein) and, in the long run, to physical (e.g., cardiovascular disease) or psychological (e.g., depression) diseases [6-7].

Methodology: The study was conducted in an Italian healthcare organization. Nurses and doctors (N = 98) completed a self-report questionnaire (Cronbach's alpha = .84) aimed at determining WB. Moreover, participants underwent a clinical interview, followed by a blood sample withdrawal.

Findings: Multiple regression analysis showed that WB was positively associated with IL-17 (β = .24, p < .05), controlling for the effect of possible confounders, namely gender, age, and BMI.

Conclusion & Significance: This study provide initial support for the hypothesis that WB is positively associated with IL-17, a possible biomarker of stress. Therefore, given its negative consequences, organizations and practitioners should implement interventions aimed at preventing WB, providing workers at risk with resources to cope with WB, and reducing the negative impact of WB on the health of the worker (i.e., primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention).ental Medicine 60:779-783.

 

 

Keynote Forum

Mohammed Yunus

NEIGRIHMS, India

Keynote: Trauma Resuscitation – Damage control Resuscitation

Time : 11:40-12:20

Trauma 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mohammed Yunus photo
Biography:

Md Yunus is an Emergency Physician from NEIGRIHMS, Shillong. He is the Head of Department of Emergency Medicine & Traumatology. He has put forward all the efforts to initiate, develop and establish the Department of Emergency Medicine in this part of the Country. His goal in life is to make available the emergency patient-care services to all the citizens of this country and that emergency care should be equal without delay, efficient and reasonably cost effective. He has keen interest in Bio-Medical Research & Academic in Medical Sciences. He is a renowned Trainer & Researcher being as Dean (Research) & Coordinator of Department of Medical Education at centre of Excellence which is also known as AIIMS of North-East which is designated as Autonomous Tertiary care Super specialty Medical Institute known as North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health & Medical Sciences (NEIGRIHMS), Shillong, Meghalaya under the Government of India (Ministry of Health & Family Welfare).

Abstract:

Trauma resuscitation has remained a hot topic of research as well as debate and damage control resuscitation has gained popularity over the last decade. Damage control resuscitation focuses on stopping hemorrhage, replacing fluids lost and correcting the lethal triad of coagulopathy, acidosis and hypothermia. Despite improvements in our knowledge in trauma resuscitation, optimal management of hypotensive trauma patients are still in grey area and under investigations. Even method of fluid delivery & the type of fluid, blood products used are still not clear. The present teaching-learning session is aimed to discuss these issues with current and recent knowledge in pre-hospital and emergency department resuscitation of poly-trauma patients along with our experience in managing trauma patients in a remote hilly area of India.

 

Keynote Forum

Andreas Fette

University of Pecs, Hungary

Keynote: Airway lesions in children: How to deal with these emergency medical situations?

Time : 12:20-13:00

Trauma 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Andreas Fette photo
Biography:

Andreas Fette is an active Clinical Consultant Pediatric Surgeon. He has been working for many years in abroad in the field of Pediatric Emergency Surgery in developing countries. He has published more than 80 original papers, contributed to 18 book chapters and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of medical journals. Investigations on the traumatized pediatric airway have been a main topic of his master’s thesis for his professorship in Pediatric Surgery.

Abstract:

Lesions of the pediatric airway are considered to be rare but always serious and challenging injuries. In many cases, they are nearly invisible or hidden behind other more sinister and more obvious trauma conditions. In other cases, the child seems to be pretty stable, before it suddenly shows rapid, unexpected and sometimes even fatal deterioration. Sometimes the trauma (and its sequelae) to the airway is clearly visible, but in due course the resulting impact is less problematic and the recovery is unspectacular. Regardless if seen first by a junior or senior doctor, the trauma to the airway is overlooked on scene in a number of cases and the child therefore is not transferred directly to the (urgently needed) specialist care. There are extremely various mechanisms of accident and etiologies of airway trauma making recognition of the leading clinical signs and key symptoms especially in children nearly impossible. But significant compromise of the child`s airway has to be considered anytime and our resulting emergency management is of key importance either to save the patient`s life or at least to prevent life-long sequelae. In this communication, we would like to share our experience and management strategies out of our case series to stimulate a discussion about how to deal with these rare but complex emergency medical situations.

  • Elderly Trauma and Critical Care
    Intensive Care in Trauma
    Trauma & Critical Care Nursing
    New Technology in Trauma
    Psychological Trauma
Speaker

Chair

Cuong Tran Chi

University of Medicine and Pharmacy at HCM, Vietnam

Speaker

Co-Chair

Dimitrios Karakitsos

University of South Carolina, USA

Session Introduction

Tim Collins

Teleflex Medical, UK

Title: Theory & Practice of Intraosseous Access: An interactive workshop

Time : 14:35-15:25 (WORKSHOP)

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Tim Collins has around 20 years’ experience within critical care working in a variety of positions within Intensive Care, Critical Care Outreach and Higher Education.  Holding positions as Consultant Nurse, Lead Nurse, Charge Nurse, ICU Educator & Senior Lecturer.  Tim is currently a British Association of Critical Care Nurses (BACCN) elected national board member and sits on the editorial board for Nursing in Critical Care Journal (Wiley). Tim has undertaken a number of presentations at European & International conferences and has published a number of papers in peer reviewed journals and book chapters. Tim holds a Doctorate in Education and a MSc in Critical Care and is an Instructor in both Adult and Paediatric Advanced Life Support.  Tim has specialist interests in Sepsis, Clinical shock, vascular access, Resuscitation, Organ Donation and Haemodynamic monitoring. 

Abstract:

Contents of workshop:

Evaluation of the literature relating to Intraosseous Access (IO).Indications & contraindications for IO access.Critical Appraisal of the benefits and limitations of IO access.Correct land marking for IO access sites.Evidence based recommendations for IO practice and care management.Practical demonstration of gaining IO access with simulation bones and IO equipment. Application of theory to a clinical simulation scenario involving a patient with difficult vascular access.An interactive quiz to facilitate discussion and learning relating to IO theory.

Participant involvement:

The workshop will involve attendees demonstrating practical application of gaining IO access with simulation bones & IO equipment. Demonstration and application of correct land marking for IO access. Application of pit crew CPR simulation for enabling an IO inserter to achieve access during a medical emergency. The workshop will involve attendees to reflect upon difficult vascular access patients and share their experiences within a supportive environment. An interactive case study relating to difficult vascular access and a quiz will facilitate discussion and reflection amongst the group.

Flow of workshop:

Visual power point slides evaluating the literature relating to IO theory. Critique of the benefits and limitations of IO access.Demonstration of land marking techniques.Pit Crew CPR simulation. Attendee’s undertaking practical application of IO simulation.Application of IO access to a clinical scenario.Interactive quiz, reflection and discussion.

Intended learning outcome:

This interactive workshop aims to enhance emergency provider’s knowledge, practice and confidence with Intraosseous Vascular access.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Melanie Berube is pursuing her PhD at McGill University. She completed an Acute Care Post-master’s Nurse Practitioner diploma at University of Toronto and a Master’s degree at Université de Montréal. She has worked as an Advanced Practice Nurse in Orthopedics and Trauma for five years and she is a Clinical Nurse Specialist in the fields of Trauma and Critical Care. She currently holds the positions of Trauma Co-ordinator and Research Coordinator in Department of Nursing at Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montreal, a level one trauma center. Her research interest includes “Prevention of adverse events in trauma including the acute to chronic pain transition”.

Abstract:

Up to 86% of patients with serious extremity trauma (ET) develop chronic pain. People affected by chronic pain report a worse quality of life than individuals affected by common chronic disease. Moreover, chronic pain imposes a high socio-economic burden. Several psychological risk factors have been disclosed to be involved in the development of chronic pain including pain catastrophizing, pain-related fear as well as anxiety and depression symptoms. Some empirical evidence has revealed that interventions based on a cognitive-behavioral approach which aims to increase self-management behaviors could prevent chronic pain by addressing psychological risk factors. Consequently, we developed a self-management intervention tailored to patients with serious ET. Clinicians from various disciplines (n=10) and patients’ (n=6) assessed intervention acceptability according to the following criteria: effectiveness, appropriateness, suitability and convenience. Data was collected through the treatment acceptability and preference (TAP) questionnaire and a focus group. The TAP questionnaire mean scores indicated that clinicians and patients assessed positively to very positively (score≥2/4) the preliminary version of the intervention. Improvements such as breaking up sessions and integrating an e-health component to the intervention were discussed during the focus group with clinicians. Patients proposed modifications to intervention activities and identified the necessity to better tailor activities and dose to each individual during the intervention pre-test. This study provided information about the refinements that need to be made to the preventive intervention to improve its acceptability. The next step will be to assess the feasibility of the improved intervention in the context of a pilot RCT.

Calvin Mak

Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong

Title: Outcome of surgical evacuation for acute subdural hematoma in geriatric head injury

Time : 16:15-16:45

Speaker
Biography:

Calvin Mak is a Neurosurgeon specialist, working as an Associate Consultant at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Hong Kong. After completing his graduation at University of Hong Kong, he worked at several neurosurgery centers in Hong Kong during Neurosurgical training, and completed the fellowship of FRCSEd (SN) in 2014. His current clinical and research interest includes “Traumatic brain injury, skull base surgery, neuro-endoscopy, and minimal access brain and spine operations”. He is also interested in implementing information technology in postgraduate training and medical practice.

Abstract:

Introduction: Traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) in elderly suffering from moderate and severe head injury is associated with poor outcome. The effect of surgical evacuation of traumatic ASDH in absence of other hematoma is not well studied.

Material & Method: We retrospectively review the data from the trauma registry of a regional trauma centre, from 2007 to 2010. Patients with isolated traumatic ASDH aged between 65 and 90, with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) not more than 13 on admission, were included.

Results: There were 31 patients with mean age 77 (65–89), and 55% were men. GCS on admission was not more than eight in 36%, and 24% had one or both pupils being non-reactive. The mean thickness of subdural hematoma was 15 mm (2.9–29.1), and mean midline shift was 7.6 mm (0–20.7). At least, one significant comorbidity was present in 80% of patients, while 45% were on antiplatelets and/or anticoagulants. Ten patients (32.3%) underwent craniotomy for evacuation of hematoma. 21 patients was treated conservatively. The operated group had more midline shift on imaging than the conservative group (p=0.012). Patient baseline characteristics and clinical status upon admission were similar between the two groups. 30 days mortality was associated with increased ASDH thickness (p=0.000), more midline shift (p=0.011) and worse revised trauma score (p=0.038). Good outcome at six months (Glasgow outcome score 4-5) was associated with younger age (p=0.049) and evacuation of ASDH (p=0.015). Multivariate analysis showed evacuation of hematoma (OR 7.1, 95% CI 1.1–43.5, p=0.036) was an independent predictor for good outcome. 60% of operated group could live independently at six months, whereas only 14.3% of conservative group had good outcome at six months.

Conclusions: Surgical evacuation of isolated traumatic ASDH is beneficial in elderly patients suffering from moderate and severe head injury.

Mohamed Abbasy

Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar

Title: Fiberoptic bronchoscopy, Should we bring it down? : Case report

Time : 16:45-17:15

Speaker
Biography:

Mohamed E Abbasy is currently working as an Emergency Medicine Clinical Fellow at Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar. He successfully completed his Injury Prevention Research and Training Program at University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Maryland, USA. He has attended R Adams Shock Trauma Center, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Maryland in 2008. He completed his training in Emergency Medicine and successfully awarded the fellowship of Egyptian Board of Emergency Medicine in 2009. He has a good experience of working in Gulf region and worked as an Assistant Program Director of Saudi Board of Emergency Medicine in Eastern region, KSA in 2013. He successfully passed his membership examination of Royal College of Emergency Medicine UK in 2014 and European Board of Emergency Medicine in 2016. His research interest includes Critical Care, Trauma and Emergency Ultrasound.

Abstract:

Many diagnostic and therapeutic interventions were pulled down to emergency department in the last two decades like point-of-care applications of ultrasound (PoCUS). Fiberoptic bronchoscopy is another fundamental tool which can provide essential lifesaving interventions to critically ill patients in emergency department. Here, we report a 47 year old male patient, known to have chronic bronchitis and alcoholic liver disease, he presented to the emergency department with a circulatory collapse due to an acute pancreatitis. In Trendelenburg position, right IJ CVC was inserted under ultrasound guidance. Post procedure chest X-ray showed right upper lobe lung collapse which progressed after 2 hours into a total lung collapse and hypoxia. Endotracheal intubation with mechanical ventilation was required and subsequent computed tomographic angiography confirmed in place catheter with no extravasation but a large volume pleural effusion associated with complete lung collapse on the right side. Bedside flexible bronchoscopy, done at ICU by critical care physician, revealed a large mucous plug occluding the right main bronchus with a smaller one at the right upper branching bronchus both were removed immediately. Repeated chest X-ray after 6 hours showed lung expansion with a dramatic decrease of the volume of pleural effusion. Patient was extubated on day three of admission and left the hospital with a full neurological and respiratory recovery on the seventh day. Such a complication was never reported before. The delay of diagnostic and therapeutic bedside flexible bronchoscopy due to unavailability or lack of trained operator could results in potential significant morbidity or mortality. We recommend expansion of training of bedside flexible bronchoscopy to all emergency physicians starting its basics during residency training years.

Speaker
Biography:

Delvene Soares is a 4th year Resident in General Surgery. Currently, she is pursuing her training at Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Her research interest includes Trauma Surgery and Clinical Research. She is an author of two publications. She is a member of Pakistan Medical and Dental Council.

Abstract:

Introduction: Patients admitted to the surgical intensive care units (SICUs) pose a significant burden on both the health care services and the economy. In our institution and moreover in our part of the world, data concerning the morbidity and mortality in these patients is unknown. With an increasing number of patients admitted to the service, figures need to be calculated to establish guidelines and quality indicators.

Aim: This study aims to calculate the risk of infectious complications in the SICU, and to calculate the mortality rate and ratio.

Materials & Methods: This is a retrospective review of patients admitted to the SICU at Aga Khan University Hospital from January 2010 to December 2014. Only adult general surgery and trauma patients were included. Data was collected about the types of morbidities, the mortality rate and different factors that affect this rate. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was also calculated.

Results: A total of 243 patients were included. The mean age was 49±18 years. ER admissions comprised of 89% of patients with 67% having planned ICU admission. The average length of ICU stay was 5.57 days. The mean APACHE II score was 19.59. Hospital/ventilator-associated pneumonia was seen in 33%, blood stream infections in 27%, central line infections in 4% and catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 13%. The mortality rate was 45.3%. Age, unplanned ICU admissions and non-trauma admissions were found to be significantly associated with mortality (P<0.05). The SMR was 1.81 for operative cases and 1.36 for non-operative cases.

Conclusion: Our mortality rate and SMR is high when compared to international institutions. This could be due to the paucity of regional data for comparison. Our study highlights the benefit of a planned ICU admission and criteria should be established to define which patients need critical care.